Home Biology Over 3 Billion Birds Have Disappeared Since The 1970s
Biology By Trista -

Over 3 Billion Birds Have Disappeared Since The 1970s
Photo Credit: Pixabay

36. Slender-Billed Grackle

The slender-billed grackle was a bird that was native to central Mexico. It was closely related to the great-tailed grackle. This bird lived primarily in the Toluca Valley and the Valley of Mexico.

This bird went extinct near the turn of the 20th century. No slender-billed grackles have been seen since 1910. They typically lived on the borders of lakes and marshes. These birds used aquatic vegetation for nest building. Once the population of Mexico began to grow, they adapted to be able to live in towns and around people. They ate a varied diet of plants, animals, and fruit. Its primary food source was maize, worms, and flies.

Over 3 Billion Birds Have Disappeared Since The 1970s
Photo Credit: Pixabay

37. Dusky Seaside Sparrow

The dusky seaside sparrow was a subspecies of the seaside sparrow. It lived in Florida along the St. Johns River and the natural salt marshes of Merritt Island. The last known dusky seaside sparrow died on June 1987. This bird was officially marked extinct in December 1990.

The dusky seaside sparrow was first discovered in 1872. It is separate from other seaside sparrows because of its distinct song and dark coloring. Conservationists tried to save the unique species by breeding it with Scott’s seaside sparrows, but the project was unsuccessful due to them only having male dusky seaside sparrows to work with.

Over 3 Billion Birds Have Disappeared Since The 1970s
Photo Credit: Pixabay

38. Tytthostonyx

Not much is known about the Tytthostonyx bird. It was a prehistoric seabird that lived approximately 66 million years ago. This bird was found in the Hornerstown Formation of New Jersey, which is on the border of the Cretaceous-Paleocene boundary.

Paleontologists believe that the Tytthostonyx was closely related to the modern-day pelicans, petrels, and albatrosses. Tytthostonyx is the single species in the Tytthostonygidae family. It was a seabird, so it most likely dined in fish and dove for them in the ocean like its descendants the pelican. This bird is considered to be one of the oldest members of the major seabird group.

Over 3 Billion Birds Have Disappeared Since The 1970s
Photo Credit: Pixabay

39. Bachman’s Warbler

The Bachman’s warbler is a small migratory bird that scientists believe is extinct. It breeds in the swampy cane and blackberry thickets located in the southeast. During the winter, Bachman’s warbler migrates to warm Cuba.

The estimated last sighting of the Bachman’s warbler was in Louisiana in August 1988. This bird was discovered in 1832 in Charleston, South Carolina. Experts believe that it is distantly related to the golden-winged and blue-winged warblers. Bachman’s warblers breed mostly in the Gulf Coast states along the Mississippi River as well as the southern Atlantic coastal plain. This bird fed on mostly spiders, caterpillars, and other types of arthropods.

Over 3 Billion Birds Have Disappeared Since The 1970s
Photo Credit: Pixabay

40. Imperial Woodpecker

The imperial woodpecker is a member of the Picidae woodpecker family. It is considered a tropical species. This bird is critically endangered and is most likely extinct.

If there is a chance that this bird is not extinct, it would be the largest species of woodpecker. It measures between 22 and 24 inches long. Compared to other woodpeckers, the imperial woodpecker has a faster wing flap rate as well as slower climbing strides. They are all black except for a red crest on the top of their heads. Some people refer to this bird as the Mexican ivory-billed woodpecker. They were mostly inhabitants of Mexico.

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