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40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Charlton Heston in Soylent Green [Image via Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer]

23. Soylent Green (Dystopian 2000s)

Soylent Green came out in 1973 and stars Charlton Heston. It’s actually based on a science fiction novel called Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Harrison, published in 1966. The main plot is that by 2022, we’re going to be living in a dystopian world. However, this all begins at the tail-end of the 90s as we head into 2000.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Ifccenter]
They claim that overpopulation and global warming will have brought as a shortage of food, water, and housing. That results in the need for Soylent Green. The entire concept of the movie goes on its ability to convince you of the dystopian society, which simply never occurred.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Bruce Willis & Brad Pitt In 12 Monkeys [Image via Universal Studios]

22. 12 Monkeys (People Wiped Out By Super Virus)

The 12 Monkeys movie stars Bruce Willis and Brad Pitt and was released in 1995. They gave themselves an over 20-year window but missed the mark a lot. The plot of the film is that a virus is released in 1996, which is now wiping out mankind heavily by 2035.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Nbcnews]
Time travel is somehow invented then, resulting in the main star James Cole, going back in time to 1996 to stop the virus from ever being released. He gets mixed up through different times sadly, from 1990 to the early 1900s and more. He eventually makes it and stops the virus. We’re around 25 years in the future and no deadly virus has happened, so we’re likely good.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Sylvester Stallone & Wesley Snipes In Demolition Man [Image via Warner Bros. Pictures]

21. Demolition Man (Great Earthquake Combined Cities In 2010)

Demolition Man was released in 1993, based on the book Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, released in 1931. In the movie, by 1996, we’ve found ways to cryogenically freeze people. We apparently decided to use this concept for the California Cryo-Penitentiary. This results in most prisoners being put on ice until 2032.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Economist]
Yet the main timeline problem is that an earthquake happens in 2010 that apparently tore through California. It then resulted in Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, San Diego becoming one city called San Angeles. Of course, this never happened, but earthquakes have occurred in California since 1993. Yet the biggest crime in this movie is all the Taco Bell stuff. We can’t let that be our future!!

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Richard Eden In Robocop: The Series [Image via Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer]

20. Robocop: The Series (Police/Corporate Controlled State)

Robocop: The Series reportedly takes place around 4 to 5 years after the original movie, yet it ignores the events of Robocop 2 & 3. We never get exact dates but we’re led to believe its set in the late 90s and early 2000s. This can vary from episode to episode. The show features a future Detroit that has a severe financial collapse due to high crime and financial issues.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Empireonline]
The city then agrees to a deal major corporation Omni Consumer Products where they’ll run Detroit’s police department in exchange for getting to rebuild a section of the city to make it a Utopia. Officer Alex Murphy is killed while on duty, but Omni claims his body and turns him into Robocop. He then helps Omni’s PD, which the series follows. None of this ever went down in the 90s or 2000s.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Keanu Reeves in Scanner Darkly [Image via Warner Entertainment Pictures]

19. A Scanner Darkly (Extreme Police Monitoring In Drugged-Up 1994)

A Scanner Darkly is a pretty weird but well-liked science fiction film. It’s unique in how it looks and feels, but the story has some flaws. The movie is based on a novel of the same name by brilliant science fiction author Phillip K. Dick. It was published in 1977 but the movie came out in 2006.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via 25yearslatersite]
It’s critical we mention times as the movie takes place after the novel’s setting in 1994. In the novel, we’re somehow in a dystopian Orange County that seems to be hooked on drugs, mostly the books Substance D. All of this with extreme police monitoring. What is so weird is that the movie remained loyal to the book’s timeline despite being 12 years removed, in the future!!

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Ethan Hawke, Willem Dafoe, & Sam Neil in Daybreakers [Image via Lionsgate]

18. Daybreakers (2019 Vampire Plague)

Daybreakers, released in 2009, made a bold prediction about what would happen 10 years later. While the movie claims that a random virus released in the 2009 year, we’re sent forward 10 years in the movie. The virus apparently causes humans to essentially become vampires. As a result, the human population decreases constantly, leaving vampires lacking blood and becoming psychotic.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Ultrahd.highdefdigest]
Now, humans are being treated like cows or chickens as they are harvested in laboratory farms for their blood. All while an attempt at making a synthetic blood substitute is being developed. Obviously, none of this happened from 2009 to 2019. Also, Vampires aren’t real. Someone needed to say it!

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Harrison Ford in Blade Runner (1982) [Image via Warner Bros. Pictures]

17. Blade Runner (Human-Like Robots In 2019)

The original Blade Runner came out in 1982 but is based in 2019. Going over 30 years into the future usually is smart, but their future seemed a bit too “optimistic” with tech and progress. Meanwhile, it’s behind on other things.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Tativille.blogspot]
Blade Runner is terrific but there are tons of things wrong in this movie, now that we have the benefit of hindsight. The movie claims that by 2019, we’ll have robots so advanced that they can pass for actual humans. Today, likely the most advanced android is Sophia the Robot. Despite her advanced ways, no one confuses her for a real person.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Malcolm McDowell In A Clockwork Orange [Image via Warner Bros. Pictures]

16. A Clockwork Orange (Forcing Psychological Treatment On Criminals)

A Clockwork Orange is a really weird yet slightly creepy science fiction 1971 Stanley Kubrick-led film based on the book of the same name. The book was written by Anthony Burgess and released in 1962.  The timeframe of the story isn’t given but we’re led to believe, based on what was present, that we’re somewhere around 1995.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Indiewire]
In the film, Ludovico, a psychological treatment, is given to criminals who are incredibly violent. The treatment works by making them sick at the very thought of violence. We do often have counseling for violent criminals or those who have violence problems. However, near 20 years removed from the 1990s, nothing like this exists. It also likely never could in the way Ludovico is presented.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Scarlett Johansson In Ghost In The Shell [Image via Paramount Pictures]

15. Robotic Enhancements (Multiple Science Fiction Films, TV Shows, & Books)

It seems science fiction media will never tire of robotic enhancements. This happens when someone perhaps has a critical injury that brings them near death. Perhaps a government agency is involved too! They’ll be given replacements for their body to cybernetically enhance them then go out on random world-saving adventures.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Readersdigest]
However, most of these futuristic cybernetic upgrades haven’t happened. Every movie that uses them goes heavily overboard. You don’t have to look much further than the Six Million Dollar Man to see this. Others like Upgrade, Ghost in the Shell, and much more use similar concepts in future versions. The cybernetic technology comes off advanced but not as much as people seem to think. Look back at older films that use this and you’ll see some odd-looking tech.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Gil Gerard As Buck Rogers [Image via Universal Pictures]

14. Buck Rogers In The 25th Century (Nuclear War In 1987)

The TV show Buck Rogers in the 25th Century aired from 1979-1981. The show centers around NASA/USAF Pilot, Captain William Anthony “Buck” Rogers. He launches into space via a spacecraft in May of 1987 but issues arise once he gets there. A life-support malfunction in the aircraft essentially freezes Buck.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Earth]
He is then discovered adrift in space in the year 2491, around 504 years after his mission launched. The 25th Century has cryopreservation, and gases from Buck’s aircraft have a formula within that closely relates. Thus, they can unfreeze and revive Rogers. Upon doing so, we’re made aware a nuclear war broke out in November of 1987, 6 months after he went into space. Of course, we know that nuclear war never broke out in the actual 1987.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Kurt Russell In Escape From L.A. [Image via Paramount Pictures]

13. Escape From Los Angeles (Just So Much From 1998-2013)

After the surprise success of the first of these films, Kurt Russell and the crew returned for Escape from Los Angeles. This movie came out in 1996, making even less sense than the original. In 1998, we see a crime-ridden Los Angeles that is now governed by the new United States Police Force. In the year 2000, an earthquake causes Los Angeles to break apart and become its own island.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Thedissolve]
A Presidential candidate claims that LA was being punished by God and then is elected President for life. We then find out the President made LA essentially a prison. In 2013, the President’s daughter Utopia is seduced via a holographic system and…wait, we’re pretty sure that we’ve written enough to prove our point here.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Rollerball In Action [Image via Columbia Pictures]

12. Rollerball (Ruled By Corporations In 2018)

There original Rollerball came out in 1975 and takes place in a dystopian future. It’s actually set in 2018 where somehow rollerball has become a major sport in a world run by corporations that replaced governments. Jonathan, a famous rollerball player, is asked to retire. His sponsors think he’s overexposed.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Empireonline]
He refuses. becoming too threatening to them and their attempts to kill individualism. Therefore, they make the game more dangerous to force him to retire. Of course, while money in politics can be an issue, corporations do not run countries. We also do not have a big television with three others on top of it either. There is so much wrong with their 2018 that is kind of surprising how off they were.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Michael J. Fox Stands On Flying Delorean [Image via Universal Pictures]

11. Back To The Future II (Flying Cars In 2015)

Set in the year 2015, the Back to the Future II‘s main premise is that Doc and Marty originally go to the future to fix a few issues with Marty’s future kids. This seems weird, as it’s the future and could be altered simply by Marty knowing in 1985. In any case, this future is then messed around with when “Old Biff” sees the time-traveling Delorean.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Slashgear]
He goes back in time with a future Sports Almanac to make his younger self richer. Now Marty has to find a way to fix it. However, despite how good the movie might be, we have yet to see the numerous flying cars. We have especially not seen a flying Delorean, and that’s the biggest crime.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Moon Base In 2001: A Space Odyssey [Image via Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer]

10. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Colonizing The Moon)

While 2001: A Space Odyssey may be a terrific science fiction movie, it still does get a lot wrong about our future. To be fair to the film of 1968, we’d obviously love to see their version of 2001 in part. In fact, one major thing we’d love to see is the colonization of the moon.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Medium]
In some ways, this was nice to consider. Their movie came out just one year before Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped foot on the moon in 1969. To some, it seemed like the next logical step was colonizing the big rocky thing. However, it has yet to occur. Here’s hoping it happens in the 2020s!

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Giancarlo Prete In Warriors Of The Wasteland [Image via New Line Cinemas]

9. Warriors Of The Wasteland (Nuclear War In 2019)

Warriors of the Wasteland was released in 1984 but actually came out in Italy under the name “New Barbarians” the year prior. On top of this, it was actually the first of three movies in a series. They were all shot in 6 months, which tells you the true care put into all three projects.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Nydailynews]
In the film, we’re led to believe that the world experiences a nuclear war in 2019. This makes what was once the United States into a wasteland that cults or gangs are trying to take over. One gang, The Templars, attempt to kill off all the survivors. The reception of the film(s) is heavily mixed.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Clive Owen In Children Of Men [Image via Universal Studios]

8. Children Of Men (Human Race Dying Out Due To Infertility In Men)

Children of Men was released in 2006, starring a prime Clive Owens. The concept of the movie seems compelling. Plus, the movie went another direction by telling us that the human race is slowly dying out due to decades of infertility. Owen plays the only baby born in decades and has to try to figure out what is going on.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Pinterest]
All of the infertility issues began in 2009, resulting in a near collapse for the human race by the movie’s setting of 2027. Currently, we do see a falling birth rate happening but nothing this severe. Just from 2009 to 2019, we’ve seen over 43 million children born in the U.S. alone.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Future Clothing Craziness [Image via Universal Pictures]

7. Clothing (Multiple Science Fiction Films, TV Shows, & Books)

Have you ever seen anything from science fiction media and then began to think, this looks weird? The entire idea of most people who make science fiction content is that we are going to see a future of wild clothing styles. Unless they were trying to channel the 1980s, wild styles seem to be the last thing the future will head toward.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Moviehole]
There is still some clothing people wear that channel the 1950s, 1970s, and other eras due to the love of “retro” concepts. While hairstyles can be a bit wild at times, clothing rarely has ever gone in that direction. In fact, throughout most of the 2000s, we’ve minimalized and went toward darker coloring most of the time.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Geostorm Flood [Image via Warner Bros. Pictures]

6. Geostorm (Weather Satellites Keep The Planet Habitable In 201

2017 science fiction film Geostorm started out with a good concept. They mention climate change is so bad that it affects the world heavily, but they only picked 2 years into the future. In the movie, the Earth will be impacted so badly in 2019 that we will have to rely on a global system of weather-altering satellites.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via 147film.ilprimogiornodinverno]
They will be used to keep the planet habitable, but if they fail to work, a major “geostorm” will hit. This is apparently a worldwide hurricane/major storm. This movie makes no sense most of the time, making Geostorm one of the worst future predicting films ever.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Ricardo Montalbán As Khan In Star Trek II [Image via Paramount Pictures]

5. Star Trek 2: The Wrath Of Khan (Eugenics War 1992-1996)

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan is simply spectacular. It takes place in the year 2286, so how did it land on our list? Star Trek is one of the most accurate movies/television shows to ever exist. The original version of this film (there’s a 2013 remake) came out in 1982. Sadly, there’s a glaring hole.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Blurayauthority]
During one point of the film, we’re told that a Eugenics War between 1992 and 1996 wiped out most of Khan’s people. Khan and his followers were among the last of their kind due to being genetically-altered. However, we’re pretty sure a Eugenics War nor Genetic Altering of humans happened in the 90s.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Mars Colony In Blade Runner [Image via Warner Bros. Pictures]

4. Blade Runner (Off-World Colonies)

The original Blade Runner came out in 1982 and did attempt to give itself a more than 30-year cushion into the future. However, they get so much wrong in the movie that we had to highlight a few. The movie is set in 2019, allowing us to know pretty well if any of their concepts ever came to pass.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Pinterest]
While we’re not really sure completely if there is life on Mars, we are sure that Earthlings have not colonized it. At least, we do not know of any colonization that has happened. Is this possible? In the distant future, it could happen. As of 2019, not so much.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Tom Hardy In Mad Max: Fury Road [Image via Warner Bros. Pictures]

3. Mad Max Series (Post-Apocalyptic World)

While a lot of science fiction media has given us a setting that looks odd or tends to look bad for random reasons, Mad Max took a different approach. The series was always hard to put a timeframe on due to the series attempting to avoid the very thing we’re doing with it now. However, an interview with George Miller in 1984 gave us a clue.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Qz]
It’s supposedly set somewhere between the 1990s and 2018. Miller gave us more than a 20-year window with that. How did their desolate world come to be? We’re led to believe nuclear war and climate issues were the main cause. Yet by 2019, we’re pretty sure this isn’t our reality.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Hoverboard In Back To The Future II [Image via Universal Pictures]

2. Back To The Future II (Hoverboards In 2015)

More than anything else, this is what really makes us upset about Back to the Future II. The hoverboard, at least the type we see in the film, still does not exist. Several people have made their own version of one, yet most of them tend to be really large and ultimately aren’t as impressive.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Screencrush]
The movie depicts kids and eventually Marty riding the hoverboard like a skateboard. While “Future Biff” also has a hoverboard, he also has some nice booster rockets on his. Look science, we’re not asking for what Biff has, just give us that 80s-style hoverboard sometime soon!

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
Time Travel [Image via Superb Wallpapers]

1. Time Travel (Multiple Science Fiction Movies, TV Shows, & Books)

Time Travel has been used in tons of science fiction media. We mentioned a lot of them on this list like The Terminator and Back to the Future. Yet others also exist that we did not cover such as Dr. Who, Interstellar, The Time Traveler’s Wife, Star Trek IV, The Butterfly Effect, Planet of the Apes, and Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure.

40 Times Science Fiction Was Wrong About Predicted Future Events
[Image via Popularmechanics]
Yet the worst part about all of this is that no matter what science fiction connection we see with this, time-traveling is not possible yet. It angers us that it isn’t, mostly because there is so much we’d want to change or see. Plus, science fiction media tends to get a lot wrong about the future. We hope to see it eventually!

 

Sources: [Paramount Pictures, Lionsgate, Columbia Pictures, Trimark Pictures, Orion Pictures, New World Pictures, 20th Century Fox, Universal Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer(MGM), AVCO Embassy Pictures, The Walt Disney Company, & Warner Bros.]

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