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Animals By Monica Gray -

Wildlife Photographers Who Risked Their Lives For The Perfect Shot
Listverse

Stay Still For The Surprise Rhino

Jonathan Pledger had no idea he was in danger while taking pictures in Kruger National Park. He was simply minding his own business and taking pictures of nearby wildlife when suddenly, he heard rustling in the bushes. He knew it wasn’t a friend playing a prank on him, and when he turned around, he noticed a rhino jumping out of the bush and heading straight toward him. Instead of running, which is what any of us would have done, he stood there and continued capturing the angry rhino via photograph. As the rhino approached Pledger, he slowed down until suddenly, he stopped running. He turned left and ran straight back into the bushes, either afraid of Pledger or simply changing his mind (Listverse).

Wildlife Photographers Who Risked Their Lives For The Perfect Shot
Photography by Jos Van Bommel

A Sedated Tiger Woke Up At The Wrong Time

Wildlife photographer Marsel Van Oosten had a scary moment when he attempted to photograph a sedated tiger up close. He set up a remote-controlled camera with a wide-angle lens but realized he had placed it wrong after the vet gave the antidote. As he walked towards the tiger to move the camera, it woke up, growled, and chased after him. Luckily, the tiger was still groggy and only managed to take a few steps. The goal is always to prevent any situation where the animal feels threatened, but sometimes, despite precautions, accidents happen. [The Phoboglapher]

Wildlife Photographers Who Risked Their Lives For The Perfect Shot
Insider

Graeme Purdy Had To Flee A Scene With Lions

Purdy was also photographing lions when they sniffed him out. Suddenly, he had to make a quick decision and flee the scene. He initially took the doors off of his vehicle to get the makeshift bomb disposal robot out of the car, but a lioness smelled him. They surrounded his car like sharks. He said, “it was the only time ever I said to the driver, ‘Look we need to go. We need to back up here. We need to give the cats a little bit of space because they’re not happy.” He found beauty in their aggression and admitted that “prides can be quite spread out over large areas, but they always seemed to be together and really photogenic.” But Purdy was able to get closer to wildlife than many of us could ever dream of experiencing (Insider).

Wildlife Photographers Who Risked Their Lives For The Perfect Shot
Listverse

Bitten By The Deadliest Snake In The World

The black mamba is not a snake you want to mess with. It’s one of the world’s deadliest snakes. When a black mamba bites you, there is a one-hundred percent chance of dying. There are not many things in life that give you a one-hundred percent chance of death. Somehow, Mark Laita managed to surpass that percentage, since most people will die within a few hours. The moment the snake bit him, Laita snapped a photo. While in Central America, Laita was taking photographs of snakes for a book he was working on. Even though the collector had removed the venom from most of the snakes, he hadn’t removed it from the black mamba. While snapping the photos, the mamba moved closer to Laita and bit him when scared. He bled profusely, and Laita assumes the snake did not release any venom, or the venom left his body when he bled profusely. Either way, he lived to tell the tale and has proof of it (Listverse).

Wildlife Photographers Who Risked Their Lives For The Perfect Shot
Nature TTL

Unprofessional Nature Photographers Create Dangerous Situations

When wildlife photographers become too desperate to get the perfect shot, they may end up putting themselves and the animals in danger. Instead of keeping a safe distance and respecting the animal’s boundaries, some photographers may push their luck by getting too close or taking unnecessary risks. This can lead to a stressful and potentially harmful situation for both the photographer and the animal. It’s important for photographers to prioritize safety and ethical practices in their pursuit of capturing stunning wildlife photographs.

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