Home AnimalsWhy Saltwater Crocodiles Are The Scariest Reptile Alive
AnimalsBy Monica Gray -

Why Saltwater Crocodiles Are The Scariest Reptile Alive
Daily Mail

How To Survive An Attack

Don’t ever provoke or harass a saltwater crocodile. They’re unpredictable and aggressive and will attack a human or prey at any given second. But if you’re floating gently in a river, minding your own business, and you spot a saltwater crocodile, that’s a different story. Let’s say you’re swimming when suddenly, a saltwater crocodile appears. What would you do? Because they’re the scariest reptile alive, there’s not much you can do, but there are some things you can do to increase your chances of survival. Basically, “if you spot a croc, back away slowly and try not to make sudden movements. Splashing in water will only draw attention. If a crocodile heads your way, run away in a straight line. The myth about moving in a zig-zag motion is just that—a myth. Crocodiles can move at 10 miles per hour, so remove those flip flops so you can run faster” (History). So all you need to do is run. Run as fast as you can.

Why Saltwater Crocodiles Are The Scariest Reptile Alive
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Powerful And Vulnerable Eyes

Saltwater crocodiles have powerful eyes, but it’s also the most sensitive, vulnerable part of their body. One of the only ways you can survive an attack from a saltwater crocodile is to gauge its eyes out. In 2014, Stephen Moreen survived an attack by gauging a saltwater crocodile’s eyes out. “The croc began to roll him under the water when Moreen spotted the croc’s eye and poked it with his fingers. The creature released him and swam away. A crocodile’s eyes are impressive: They can see underwater at night and retract during a fight. They are also, however, one of the most vulnerable parts of the creature’s body” (History).

Why Saltwater Crocodiles Are The Scariest Reptile Alive
Shutterstock

They Need Love

Even though saltwater crocodiles are the scariest reptiles in the world, they’re an animal. And all animals need love (or at least respect from a distance), even if they’re terrifying beasts. In 1989, someone shot a saltwater crocodile named Pocho in Costa Rica. Gilberto “Chito” Sheddon discovered him and aided him back to full health. The crocodile was 150 pounds, and when Sheddon tried to release him back into the wild, Pocho found his way back to him. The two became inseparable and were captured in a documentary titled The Man Who Swims With Crocodiles. While we don’t recommend trying to befriend a saltwater crocodile, there is some hope out there (History).

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