Home AnimalsThe Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
AnimalsBy Joe Burgett -

The Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
[Image via Ken Griffiths/Shutterstock.com]

Screaming Tree Frog

  • Discovered: 2021

Australian researchers have known about the Bleating Tree Frog for a long time. It is well known to Aussies due to its incredibly loud calls, the loudest of any Australian frog known. It is often painful to listen to, being so loud and high-pitched. Originally, it was thought that the species was widespread across the continent/country from Queensland to Victoria. However, researchers in 2021 found that these frogs all over the place were not just part of one species, but three! While they look a lot alike, they are genetically different. Making them one of the newest animal species to Australia’s massive unique animal list.

The Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
[Image via New Scientist]

Star Octopus

  • Discovered: 2021

In late 2021, a new animal species from the Star Octopus line was announced. For roughly 150 years, the common octopus found on Western Australian shores was not thought to be much different than the “gloomy” octopus. You’ve likely seen this octopus across the Eastern U.S. and even in New Zealand waters. But seven years of research managed to find that the two differ. Known as the Octopus djinda, it finally has its own name like it always should. Of course, it gets its name from the Noongar language. The “djinda” name means “bright” or “star” in English, resulting in the Star Octopus name.

The Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
[Image via The Washington Post]

Myotis Nimbaensis

  • Discovered: 2021

This has to be one of the weirdest-looking animals we’ve ever seen. We’re actually kind of shocked it had not been discovered until so recently. In the Nimba Mountains of Guinea, there is a mountain range that connects Guinea, Liberia, and Côte d’Ivoire to form the “sky islands.” It is a major place for biodiversity, especially when it comes to bats. The Bat Conservation International, Cameroon’s University of Maroua, and the American Museum of Natural History teamed up to find a brand new bright orange bat they ended up naming Myotis nimbaensis. We’re a little shook by this one, people.

The Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
[Image via Phys.org]

Feiruz Wood Lizard

  • Discovered: 2021

The Huallaga Valley in Peru was filled with amazing animal species, including many lizards. Sadly, it has been affected by war and forest destruction which drastically altered the environment and led to the departure of many species. Bu the late 1990s, Peru decided to liberate the area in hopes it could help. It seems that worked out, as a new lizard species known as Enyalioides feiruzae was found. Researchers spent seven years conducting field surveys of the area to properly describe it. The species is known for its amazing, almost rainbow-like colors. With males and females differing in their color patterns.

The Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
[Image via OpenAccessGovernment.org]

Suzhen’s Krait

  • Discovered: 2021

In the Monsoon Forests of China and northern Myanmar, there lives one of the newest animal species to the krait line of snakes. Chinese scientists managed to use genetic testing to determine that the Bungarus suzhenae, or Suzhen’s Krait, was a new species. It is named after the Bai Su Zhen snake goddess from the Chinese myth, the Legend of the White Snake. This is known to be a very dangerous, venomous snake. Thus, studying it proved to be quite a challenge for the team.

The Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
[Image via BBC]

Strumigenys Ayersthey Ant

  • Discovered: 2021

Normally when a species is named after a person, scientists use the “I” for males and the “AE” for females. Yet scientists broke from this trend when it came to the naming of the Strumigenys ayersthey ant. They decided to go with the inclusive “they” pronoun to promote nonbinary gender inclusivity. It is also named after the late human rights activist, Jeremy Ayers. This ant species is known of ant is known for snapping its jaws shut faster than most other creatures at 1.2 million mps2.

The Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
[Image via DW]

Zombie Frog

  • Discovered: 2021

This frog is straight out of a horror movie. It was discovered when German Herpetologist Raffael Ernst heard a frog call from under the ground in the Amazon Rainforest. Rain was pouring down, it was muddy out, but he wanted to know where the call was coming from. He then managed to find what has now been referred to as the Zombie Frog. While orange and about 1.5 inches, it is not named due to being one of the “walking dead.” Rather, Ernst named it this because researchers often look like zombies when they dig out frogs from the ground.

The Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
[Image via SciTechDaily]

Rose-Veiled Fairy Wrasse

  • Discovered: 2022

Some of the newest animal species have already been discovered in 2022 thus far as of this writing. One is known as the Rose-veiled fairy wrasse. It is quite a “cutesy” sounding name for an animal species. However, one could likely come to the conclusion based on how it looks that the name works just fine. University of Sydney Doctoral Student, Yi-Kai Tea claims that this was thought to be a widespread species of fish before now. Yet it was just recently found that it differed enough to be genetically different. Tea stated that this is one of the reasons properly describing taxonomy in general for new species is important.

The Newest Animal Species Discovered in the Last Decade
[Image via Live Science]

Blanket Octopus

  • Discovered: 2022

One version of the blanket octopus species was assumed to exist for twenty years now but is rare for people to see. That was until it was found by biologist Jacintha Shackelton on Lady Elliot Island in Australia in a rare sighting. At first, Shackleton assumed it was a juvenile fish with long fins but as they began to get closer it was confirmed to be a blanket octopus. Now proving this version of the species existed. The species’ name comes from the blankets that can be folded under the octopus’ arms to allow them to escape faster.

 

Where do We Find this Stuff? Here Are Our Sources:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

National Institutes of Health

Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)

United States Forestry Service

University of Wolverhampton

National Geographic

The Smithsonian

American Museum of Natural History

Australian Museum

USA Today

New York Times

 

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