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Compelling Theories About the Dreaming Brain
You may find yourself dreaming about people or situations you experienced the day before, or perhaps they are people and situations from a week ago. Shutterstock

1. Dream lag occurs when the images, experiences, or people in your dreams are ones that you have seen recently. 

When you see someone recently, perhaps the previous day or a week before, and then see them in your dream, this action is a dream lag. Experts asked people a simple question: did they see images before? In turn, they report that most images came from the previous week. The idea is that certain types of experiences can take a week to become encoded into your long-term memory. Some of the images from the consolidation process will then appear in a dream. Events people experience while awake is said to feature in one to two percent of dream reports.

On the other hand, 65 percent of dream reports reflect aspects of recent waking-life experiences. Memory theorists suggest that the hippocampus in your brain takes those events, whether from the previous day or the last week, and selects some of them to transfer into long-term memory. Those chosen then begin to transfer over to the neocortex for permanent storage. The transfer process can take about a week. Therefore, dreaming participates in the relocation of memory storage from the hippocampus to the neocortex over time. In short, you can see encoded images stay in your long-term memory by merely paying attention to your dreams!

Sources:

https://www.technologynetworks.com/neuroscience/lists/5-facts-about-the-dreaming-brain-331997

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/05/200515131915.htm

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/apr/10/scientists-identify-parts-of-brain-involved-in-dreaming

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