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The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
News Press

Hurricane Wilma

Hurricane Wilma struck in 2015 and was the most intense tropical cyclone in the Atlantic basin ever recorded. It caused over $22 billion in damage in Florida. There were 87 fatalities, and the highest winds were sustained at 185 mph. It first made landfall at Cape Romano as a Category 3 hurricane. Many people’s homes were ruined, including Viola Esquivel, who was captured by news cameras standing in front of the debris of her home, which also caught fire. She was one of many to lose their homes. She said, “I’m gonna get through this. I believe when something like this happens to you, something good will happen too.” Truthfully, it’s horrible that so many people have to go through something like this (News Press).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
Arkansas Online

Hurricane Dean

The Cayman Islands were hit by Hurricane Dean in 2007. It didn’t see the worst part of the storm, though, which headed towards Mexico’s coast. Many tourists fled the coast for safety inland. It was the most intense and strongest hurricane of the tropical storm season of 2007. It caused $1.66 billion in damage, with winds sustained at 175 mph. In the end, it affected several countries, including Guatemala, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Nicaragua (Arkansas Online).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
CNN

Hurricane Michael

Hurricane Michael barreled into Florida in 2019 as a Category 5 storm. Winds hit at 160 mph, making it one of four Category 5 hurricanes to hit the USA. It was one of the most intense and powerful hurricanes to hit the coast, causing over $25.5 billion in damage. It caused 31 direct fatalities, and 43 indirect fatalities. Mexico Beach and Panama City saw the worst part of the hurricane. Trees fell over, and numerous houses were flattened as a result of the hurricane (CNN).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
Wikipedia

Typhoon Surigae

Typhoon Surigae, also known as Super Typhoon Bising in the Philippines, was the most intense and strongest tropical cyclone to hit the Northern Hemisphere before the month of May. It originated from a low-pressure area located south of the Micronesian island. It turned into a tropical depression and then strengthened into a typhoon. There were 10 fatalities, and the highest wind speed reached a whopping 189 mph (Wikipedia).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
Red Cross

Typhoon Meranti

Typhoon Meranti swept across the Pacific in 2016, damaging areas in China and Taiwan. It’s considered the most intense and strongest storm since 2013 Typhoon Haiyan, which we saw earlier on this list. Before the typhoon hit, China issued a Red Alert, warning people of high waves and to take cover. Flights, trains, and ferries were canceled. Winds reached up to 144 mph. It began as a tropical depression near the island of Guam, eventually turning into a disastrous storm and causing over $4 billion in damage (Red Cross).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
NDTV

Tropical Cyclone Tauktae

Western India saw the wrath of Tropical Cyclone Tauktae in 2021. It was a Category 3 hurricane and was one of the most intense storms to hit the country. Scientists believe global warming was one of the causing factors of the storm, considering it’s the first time since the start of satellite records where there were four consecutive years of pre-monsoon cyclones. There were 174 fatalities, and 81 people went missing. The damage was over $2 billion. Damage included uprooting mango trees and causing other many trees to fall over (NDTV).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
Hindustan Times

Cyclone Fani

The Category 4 Cyclone Fani tore through the Indian state of Odisha. This happened after a Super Cyclone tore through the state and took more than 10,000 people’s lives in previous years, so many people feared that the same destruction and casualties would happen again. Cyclone Fani claimed 38 people out of 46 million. Its destruction caused over $8 billion in damage, due partly to winds that reached up to 130 mph and tore down many trees and the outsides of homes (Hindustan Times).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
The Guardian

Cyclone Yasa

In 2020, Cyclone Yasa tore through Fiji and caused millions of dollars in damage. When the Category 5 cyclone tore through the island, it took two lives, including a three-month-old. The impact of the cyclone was disastrous. It was feared that high tide would bring more storm surges, and therefore continue to affect the beach-side villages. The death toll was more than expected, since many people went missing and were unable to be located. Additionally, a 45-year-old man passed from the cyclone as his house collapsed on him. It was one of the most intense cyclones Fiji had ever experienced (The Guardian).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
Oxfam America

Super Typhoon Goni

Two million people were affected by Super Typhoon Goni. In 2020, it tore through the Philippines and towards the capital, Manila. It affected two million people and claimed at least 16 lives. The locals named the typhoon “Rolly,” and it was one of the most intense typhoons to ever hit the country. Lot Felizco, the Oxfam Philippines’ Country Director, said, “we have experienced terrible wind speeds, lashing rains, and devastating flooding. Goni knocked out mobile phone service, power lines, uprooted trees, and caused damage to critical infrastructure, including hospitals and markets. Homes made of light materials, particularly those near Mayon Volcano, were engulfed in floodwater and volcanic mudflows.” As a result, many roads were flooded, and the destruction took many weeks to recover from (Oxfam America).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
AP News

Storm Eunice

Northern Europe faced the wrath of Storm Eunice. It was one of the most intense storms on the continent and claimed at least nine people as high winds caused a tree to fall, a tree to fly into a car, and flying debris to smash into the windshields of cars occupied by people. Train services were canceled, and roofs were ripped off London’s O2 Arena. Gusts measured at 122 mph. All in all, it might be the strongest wind in England ever recorded. It passed through Germany, the Netherlands, Germany, and Denmark, causing mayhem in those countries, in addition to England (AP News).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
BBC

Storm Franklin

The UK saw another storm in 2022, when Storm Franklin tore through the country. It was one of the most intense storms in the UK, and caused severe flooding in parts of Northern Ireland, as well as severe disruption. Over 1.4 million homes didn’t have power. Also, three people perished, and wind speeds reached up to 87 mph in different parts of the country. It was one of three storms that hit the country that week. We’re seeing the effects of global warming right before our eyes (BBC).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
Alijazeera

Typhoon Jebi

Millions of people received a warning about Typhoon Jebi in 2018, just before it struck Japan. It was one of the most intense typhoons to ever hit the island. It came with strong winds and heavy rain, ad also impacted South Korea. In Korean, Jebi means “swallow.” Following the typhoon, the country experienced landslides, floods, and heavy rains, all of which claimed hundreds of people. Tides following this typhoon were some of the highest since the typhoon in 1961. The more we see the impact of all of these storms, the clearer we can recognize the effects of global warming in countries across the world (Aljazeera).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
BBC

Super Typhoon Rai

The Philippines was seen battling yet another typhoon in 2021, when Super Typhoon Rai rampaged through the country and caused thousands of people to seek shelter and safety. It caused widespread flooding and massive destruction to civilians’ homes. It had winds of 110mph and cut down power and communication lines. The typhoon itself affected 13 million people and caused many flights and ports to close.

It was one of the most intense and strongest typhoons to hit Southeast Asia this year. Alberto Bocanegra, head of the International Federation of the Red Cross, said, “this monster storm is frightening and threatens to hit coastal communities like a freight train.” It certainly is frightening and ended up causing a lot of destruction (BBC).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
ABC News

Typhoon Mitag

In South Korea, a powerful typhoon wrecked the south of the country. In 2020, thousands of people had to take cover. It left nine people dead, and five people missing. It also knocked out the power of over tens of thousands of homes, buried people in landslides, and displaced over 300 people from their homes. President Moon Jae-in said, “my heart aches because human casualties aren’t small.” It was one of the most intense storms in history. Every time a storm causes a casualty, it’s heartbreaking. We can only hope that these storms won’t cause as much destruction in the future (ABC News).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
World Vision

Cyclone Phailin

Cyclone Phailin touched land in India in 2013. It was one of the most intense cyclones to hit the state of Odisha in 14 years. Winds up to 140 mph and torrential rain came with the storm. The rain toppled trees and power lines, along all of the coast of Odisha and Andhra Pradesh states. The government evacuated more than one million people, in order to prevent a high death toll. The country learned from the 1999 cyclone which took 10,000 people, so they did not want to recreate that mistake (World Vision).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
Climate Change News

Typhoon Molave

Typhoon Molave hit Vietnam in 2020. It had the same intensity as a category 3 hurricane and was the fourth tropical storm to hit the Southeast Asian country. After the storm, the country experienced intense flooding and landslides that negatively impacted thousands of people. It was reported that 130 people died, and at least 18 went missing. Before the storm, Vice president of Vietnam Red Cross, Nguyen Hai Anh, reported, “Molave is expected to be the strongest and deadliest storm to hit Vietnam this year… and one of the most serious storms we have seen in years.” As heartbreaking as this is, there’s nothing to do when a storm hits, except hope for the best case scenario (Climate Change News).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
Global Citizen

Hurricane Matthew

In 2016, Hurricane Matthew destroyed Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, and eventually the Bahamas. As it rampaged through this part of the world, it claimed at least nine people and caused severe flooding and damage to the surrounding area. It had 145 mph winds, and it was the most intense and strongest storm to hit Haiti in over 50 years. There were several heartbreaking casualties, one of them being a 26-year-old man that tried to rescue a child in a river and ended up drowning. Ultimately, though, he saved the child (Global Citizen).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
VOA News

Cyclone Enawo

A cyclone hit Madagascar in 2017 and brought strong winds and heavy rains. It was one of the most intense cyclones of the year and caused massive landslides and tons of flooding. Several communities had to evacuate just before the storm hit, and many volunteers were deployed to help with the damage of the storm and to help those who lacked food, shelter, water, and basic needs. All in all, the storm caused $400 million dollars in damage. It was the strongest cyclone to hit Madagascar since Gafilo in 2004 (VOA News).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
Accuweather

Hurricane Iniki

In 1992, Hurricane Iniki tore through the Pacific Ocean and right into Hawaii. The storm caused monumental damage that affected the lives of many civilians for weeks and months following the storm. It was the state’s costliest hurricane to hit and was one of the most intense hurricanes ever recorded. In the Hawaiian language, Iniki means “strong and piercing wind,” so it is aptly named. Over 1,500 homes were destroyed, and 5,000 other homes sustained tons of damage because of the storm. Six people perished from the effects of the storm (Accuweather).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
BBC

Hurricane Grace

Hurricane Grace claimed at least eight people in 2021, as it tore through eastern Mexico. Torrential rainfall, extremely high wind, and power outages followed the destruction of the hurricane. In the state of Veracruz, the most destruction happened, where trees were uprooted, and streets were flooded to rivers of mud. Wind reached up to 125 mph. The storm weakened as it moved inland, but areas like Mexico City still saw tons of rainfall (BBC).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
SCMP

Storm Malik

In 2022, storms rampaged through the world. Storm Malik was one of the most intense storms that hit northern Europe. Five people ended up dying, many houses were destroyed, and trees fell into the street. A woman and a boy in Scotland died, and a man in Poland was taken out by a falling tree that hit his car. Many accidents caused by high winds were also reported in the Czech Republic. The destruction was widespread (SCMP).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
The New Humanitarian

Typhoon Fengshen

Typhoon Fengshen had an irregular path, and took the Philippines by surprise. Wind gusts reached up to 195 km/h, heavy rain caused landslides and flash floods, and over 700 people died from the effects of the typhoon. The typhoon also destroyed over 300,000 homes. It was one of the most intense storms in the Philippines history. It also caused one of the worst marine disasters in history, where MV Princess of the Stars, which was carrying 866 people, sank just off of the Romblon province. As a result, over 170 people died. There were only 56 survivors, and many others that were unaccounted for (The New Humanitarian).

The Most Devastating Storms that Science Has Tracked
The Summit Express

Typhoon Thelma

In November 1991, Typhoon Thelma hit the Philippines. Like many other times on this list, the Philippines have succumbed to another natural disaster. Thelma claimed more than 5,100 lives. In the Philippine’s history, it was the most intense and deadliest tropical storm ever recorded. Just as it moved over the Visayas, it reached peak intensity. Eventually, it reached southern Vietnam, where it grew weaker and eventually dissipated (The Summit Express)

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