Home BiologyThese Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
BiologyBy Monica Gray -

These Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
RSS Science

Eggshells And Human Hair Is Oddly Similar

Whenever you peel a hardboiled egg, you’ve probably noticed a thin film attached to the inside of the eggshell. Eggshells contain two membranes that help defend against invasion from bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The layers are strong and made of keratin, which is what we also have in human hair. Underneath a microscope, eggshell membranes look like human hair. Eating eggshells is also a great way to meet your calcium needs for the day, which you can get by making eggshell powder. It’s well absorbed and does a great job at strengthening the bones (RSS Science).

These Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
RD

Tomato Leaves Look Like An Alien Species

The intricate, beautiful design looks like it’s something from a fairytale land. But don’t let the beautiful patterns fool you: tomato leaves can be toxic. They’re in the nightshade family. Tomato leaves are generally considered toxic and should not be consumed. The leaves of the tomato plant contain small amounts of solanine, a poisonous compound that can cause nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms if ingested in large quantities. Solanine is found in all parts of the tomato plant, but is most concentrated in the leaves and stem. While the ripe fruit of the tomato plant is safe to eat, the leaves and stem should not be consumed, as they can cause digestive upset and other health problems. It is always best to err on the side of caution and avoid consuming any plant parts that you are unsure of. (RD).

These Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
Futurism

Maybe You’ll Have Good Luck After Looking At This Microscopic View Of The Penny`

See a penny pick it up, all day long you’ll have good luck! It’s debatable whether this old-time myth is true, but either way, pennies have been around for centuries. According to US Mint, “the penny was one of the first coins made by the U.S. Mint after its establishment in 1792. The design on the first penny was of a woman with flowing hair symbolizing liberty. The coin was larger and made of pure copper, while today’s smaller coin is made of copper and zinc.” Underneath a microscope, they’re quite beautiful and look nothing like the bronze circular shape most of us toss to the side of the road or forget about on the bottom of our purses. It has layers and layers of zigzags and lines that could be a piece of art (Futurism).

These Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
RD

Who Knew A Pencil Tip Was a Microscopic Beach?

As you can see from this photo, underneath a microscope, the tip bleeds graphite onto paper. The pencil was invented in 1795 by Nicolas-Jacques Conté, and since then, the seemingly mundane tool has grown to be one of the most used tools in the world. Underneath a microscope, it looks nothing like it does when we use it to write on paper, it almost resembles a beach with sand and coral. Either way, that is a photograph of something that’s able written on paper and then disappears with the mere stroke of an eraser (History of Pencils).

These Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
RD

We Wish Threading A Needle Was As Easy As It Looks Here

It always feels like an impossible task trying to slip thread through the tiny hole in the needle. But under a microscope, it seems like an easy task that makes us feel like fools. The microscopic image doesn’t even look real. Every fiber is on display. Because the thread is flimsy, it’s hard to control it to stick it through the hole. Here’s a pro tip: try holding the thread and needle against a white background, cutting the thread using sharp scissors, and using tweezers to help pull the thread through the hole (RD).

These Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
Smithsonian Mag

Water Bears Look Like They’re Probably In the Gummy Bear Family

The official name of water bears is Tardigrades. They’re super-animals that can survive extremely high and low temperatures, dehydration, low pressure, and high radiation. If the end of the world happened tomorrow, these guys would likely survive, while everything else on the planet would get destroyed. They’re microscopic animals with eight legs and four to eight claws. Underneath a microscope, you can see them swim or crawl. Just because we don’t see them with the naked eye doesn’t mean they’re hard to find. They’re everywhere, and that includes ferns, lichens, soil, beaches, moss, dunes, and other damp habitats (RSS Science)

These Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
Futurism

Spider Head’s – No, Nope, Absolutely Not

Spiders are terrifying enough on their own. Under a microscope, though, they look like terrifying creatures that are about to take over the world and make every human regret ever killing a spider. According to NC Gov, we can see the spider’s “cephalothorax, the fused head, and thorax also called the prosoma. It contains the brain, jaws, eyes, stomach, and leg attachments.” Next time you see a spider crawling around your house, think before you kill it. They play a huge role in keeping other pesky insects in check and are important predators.

These Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
One Large Prawn

Soap Foam Is A Trippy Dream

We see soap foam lathered all over our bodies, not underneath a microscope. But it’s an amazing everyday item to look at underneath a microscope. You don’t only have to use body soap, you can also use laundry detergent and dishwasher soap. Underneath a microscope, you’ll notice the foam is made of many unstable bubbles. According to RSS Science, “some of them will move in a direction. Some of them will collide and fuse into a bigger bubble. Some of them will suddenly burst.” If you get soap under a microscope, you can play around with the different sizes and types to get something spectacular.

These Everyday Items Turn Into Something Incredible Under a Microscope
RD

Cashmere

Underneath a microscope, cashmere looks exactly like bamboo. It also resembles human hair in an eerily similar way. It is made from the undercoat of the Cashmere goat, a breed that is native to the Himalayan region of Kashmir. The fibers of Cashmere wool are finer, softer, and stronger than regular sheep’s wool, and are also more insulating, making it a popular choice for clothing and other items. It is a luxurious and highly prized material, and is often more expensive than other types of wool. Cashmere even gets softer with age – unlike humans (RD).

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