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The Dog Descendants Who Survived Chernobyl Can be Adopted
Photo Credit: Pixabay

You Can Adopt One Of These Dogs

As news about the Chernobyl dog adoption program is spreading, plenty of people are expressing interest in bringing one of these pups home. You can be one of them by emailing the Clean Futures Fund at adoptions@cleanfutures.org.

Keep in mind that expressing interest in adoption does not guarantee that one of these Chernobyl dogs will curl up at the end of your bed every night. There will likely be a high demand for them, a market that will be higher than the ability to decontaminate, quarantine, and clear them for adoption.

The Dog Descendants Who Survived Chernobyl Can be Adopted
Photo Credit: Pixabay

There Are Other Ways You Can Help

Maybe you want to adopt one of these dogs but can barely hope that your name will come to the top of a long waiting list. Perhaps you have compassion for them but don’t have the room or the ability to care for a dog. After all, dogs don’t stay puppies forever, and they require a lot of work and attention throughout their lives.

There are other ways to help these dogs. You can donate and raise money to give to the Clean Futures Fund or another charity that is working to support the dogs of Chernobyl. You can also help dogs more locally, at your nearby animal shelter. The rescue dogs in your hometown are just as deserving as the dogs of Chernobyl.

 

Where Did We Find This Stuff? Here Are Our Sources:

“Chernobyl: The secrets they tried to bury – how the Soviet machine covered up a catastrophe,” by Kate Brown. The Telegraph. March 9, 2019.

“Chernobyl.” Wikipedia.

Dogs of Chernobyl.” Clean Futures Fund.

“Meet the Abandoned Dogs Living in Chernobyl,” by Lauren Lewis. World Animal News. August 21, 2017.

“Chernobyl Puppies Going Up for Adoption in the US,” by Jason Daley. Smithsonian.com. May 16, 2018.

“Hundreds Of Dogs And Puppies Live In Chernobyl – And You Can Adopt One,” by Beth Elias. Ranker.

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